Does Moya Share Too Much?

Moya's autobiography

Moderators: nessieq, gregoing, Grania, Daragh, All Moderators

Does Moya Share Too Much?

Yes
4
5%
No
72
95%
 
Total votes : 76

What if?

Postby Balor » Mon Nov 06, 2006 3:42 pm

When I was reading the book, I was left wondering if she ever thought about what her life would have been like if she hadn't had the abortion?
Who in the valley shed the poison tear?
User avatar
Balor
Enthusiastic Member
 
Posts: 292
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 6:12 am
Location: Portland, Oregon

Postby nessieq » Mon Nov 06, 2006 9:44 pm

Life's full of 'what if's, isnt it? I often wonder what i would have turned out like if i'd have done... or if i wasnt.... etc. Certainly her experiences have changed her life- although it's incredible that something wonderful could come out of such horrible experiences. I dont think it could have worked out much better for moya, even if things in her life had been different, do you?
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
-T. S. Eliot, 'Little Gidding' V
User avatar
nessieq
Moderator
 
Posts: 10856
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2003 5:58 pm
Location: Cambridge/Belfast

Postby Grania » Mon Nov 06, 2006 9:46 pm

Doesn't Moya say in the book itself that she's thought about it? It's been a long time since I read it, but I think that's right. Like Ness says, I think we all think 'what if?' from time to time.
Music and friendship - the answer to life's problems.

I heard Your voice
Whisper to the wild water
Step By Step
Slowly I turn - Máire Brennan
User avatar
Grania
Moderator
 
Posts: 11209
Joined: Tue Aug 31, 2004 2:26 pm
Location: England

Mistakes?

Postby Balor » Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:36 am

One of the "mistakes" I made was in joining the army when I was 17 (delayed entry program). However, if I hadn't, then I never would have gone to Germany and I never would have discovered Clannad.
Who in the valley shed the poison tear?
User avatar
Balor
Enthusiastic Member
 
Posts: 292
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 6:12 am
Location: Portland, Oregon

Postby irish at heart » Fri Dec 29, 2006 3:16 am

I don't think she shared too much, although I haven't read the book yet..I think it was very brave of her to share her personal life like that. :)
Follow the word
Follow the hope
Follow the dream..
User avatar
irish at heart
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 2312
Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 12:27 am
Location: where I stand

Postby sammi fredenburg » Mon Dec 03, 2007 2:50 am

i've been gone a long time, sorry, i still love her much, but the book. . . .

i had received this book as a gift from one here on the site, so very grateful for his generosity. i thot i would be immersed in it and emerge a humble fan. it wasn't that easy.

i just had surgery this month and am laid up for the holidays, and thot i would pick it up again fresh. i cheated the first time around and jumped forward to i think around chapter 15 or so, with intentions of going back to start again, but it wore me out. she's lovely, certainly the vote on whether she shares too much is her decision and i l personally don't feel there is no right or wrong answer to that. but i would read only so much and have to put it down and step back.

i love autobio's and can detach from most all. moya is a beautiful soul who lived an amazing life and her art reflects her heart.

but, you know how when in a music room when a single piano key is struck and held, and if the nearby string instruments are in perfect tune with this note, the silent still strings will begin to resonate, to vibrate? a part of me was that string, maybe still is that string. i worked in that Christian music industry for a number of years, in and out of nashville, and her experiences and aprehensions resonated so strongly it would throw me.

i think i just kept wishing i could turn a page and hope she would share that Bono would be there to throw back a few more pints, or quarts or gallons, very strong shots, in counsel regarding the west's expectations for successful, talented artists they brand as music ministers and such, the high pedistals and deep dives, of how for her to be strong and take a stand. or another person i was hoping would be there was indeed a casualty, Bob Dylan. the page never turned that way, and it broke my heart. i'm not an artist, just have burried a few, loved a few, despised a few, i was in women's and children's ministry, missions administration, and gospel radio . . . . . and we were merciless looking back on that life now. and reading her experiences takes me back there, like turning up stones and looking at the creepy crawlies underneath. so sorry.

so very sorry moya.

then, a tender moment a few days back propped up here with my ipod in random brought What Will I Do thru the earphones while i was here alone . . . . i put it on repeat over and over and over and depleted a box of tissues. (as usual with that song, too!) it reminded me of this book and the promise i made to myself to return to it and read the less dark sides of her luminous life. i don't find the behavior dark, the life of a star is not easy by any means, but the moments of darkness she wrote of when alone that even the best life couldn't brighten. and i could so relate.

i hope to hear what the last chapter has to say. maybe, to me hopefully, that years have been a balm, that like me she survived it all with a faith fully intact, tho i walked out of fellowship altogether. the the last chapter reflects something close to happily ever after. am i close?

happy holidays everyone.

stay close,

sammi
"i can't get cross with moya, i love her too much . . . . " - bono (this line made my day!)
User avatar
sammi fredenburg
Enthusiastic Member
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Mon Jan 22, 2007 8:36 am
Location: seattle washington usa

Postby jolene » Tue Feb 05, 2008 2:44 am

I finished her book over the Christmas break, and loved it. I thought she was really open and honest, especially about things she wasn't proud of. I don't know if I'd have the guts to open my life publically like that.

The question I had when I finished it was what her parents thought about it. Parts may have been hard for them to read. But, really, the book is one that ends so positively, and can be really inspiring I think.

It shows that no matter how far you fall, you can still get up and fly :D
Jo
User avatar
jolene
Member
 
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2008 9:16 pm

Postby hermeyjdi » Tue Feb 05, 2008 3:16 am

sammi fredenburg wrote:i've been gone a long time, sorry, i still love her much, but the book. . . .

i had received this book as a gift from one here on the site, so very grateful for his generosity. i thot i would be immersed in it and emerge a humble fan. it wasn't that easy.

i just had surgery this month and am laid up for the holidays, and thot i would pick it up again fresh. i cheated the first time around and jumped forward to i think around chapter 15 or so, with intentions of going back to start again, but it wore me out. she's lovely, certainly the vote on whether she shares too much is her decision and i l personally don't feel there is no right or wrong answer to that. but i would read only so much and have to put it down and step back.

i love autobio's and can detach from most all. moya is a beautiful soul who lived an amazing life and her art reflects her heart.

but, you know how when in a music room when a single piano key is struck and held, and if the nearby string instruments are in perfect tune with this note, the silent still strings will begin to resonate, to vibrate? a part of me was that string, maybe still is that string. i worked in that Christian music industry for a number of years, in and out of nashville, and her experiences and aprehensions resonated so strongly it would throw me.

i think i just kept wishing i could turn a page and hope she would share that Bono would be there to throw back a few more pints, or quarts or gallons, very strong shots, in counsel regarding the west's expectations for successful, talented artists they brand as music ministers and such, the high pedistals and deep dives, of how for her to be strong and take a stand. or another person i was hoping would be there was indeed a casualty, Bob Dylan. the page never turned that way, and it broke my heart. i'm not an artist, just have burried a few, loved a few, despised a few, i was in women's and children's ministry, missions administration, and gospel radio . . . . . and we were merciless looking back on that life now. and reading her experiences takes me back there, like turning up stones and looking at the creepy crawlies underneath. so sorry.

so very sorry moya.

then, a tender moment a few days back propped up here with my ipod in random brought What Will I Do thru the earphones while i was here alone . . . . i put it on repeat over and over and over and depleted a box of tissues. (as usual with that song, too!) it reminded me of this book and the promise i made to myself to return to it and read the less dark sides of her luminous life. i don't find the behavior dark, the life of a star is not easy by any means, but the moments of darkness she wrote of when alone that even the best life couldn't brighten. and i could so relate.

i hope to hear what the last chapter has to say. maybe, to me hopefully, that years have been a balm, that like me she survived it all with a faith fully intact, tho i walked out of fellowship altogether. the the last chapter reflects something close to happily ever after. am i close?

happy holidays everyone.

stay close,

sammi


Thanks for sharing. I am sure that was not easy for you to share! There is always hope for tomorrow!! Jolene I am glad you enjoyed it. I could not put it down but then again I am a sucker for biographies esspecally when I am a fan of the person.
Jesus said to Peter, "feed my sheep not experiment on my rats" -C S Lewis
User avatar
hermeyjdi
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 4:02 am
Location: Nashville, TN USA

Postby Macha » Sat Feb 16, 2008 9:45 pm

hermeyjdi wrote:I don't think she shared too much. We live in a world where everyone puts up masks to hide behind. No one is real anymore and it is such a breath of fresh air to read her book. I totally respect her honesty. It shows us that she is human also ya know?? It really encouraged me in my mission to be real and honest with those around me. Thanks Moya!! :D


You're right, hermeyjdi. I think, Moya just told in her book about her life experiences - good ones and bad ones. And I think the one or the other of us here had also bad experiences in life. I appreciate her for her honesty - and her courage, that she's written this book. I think it's not easy to decide to write an autobiography to tell people who you don't kow about your life experiences. Myself I maybe wouldn't have the courage to do that.
Image
User avatar
Macha
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 3338
Joined: Sat Aug 21, 2004 3:15 pm
Location: Kempten (twin town of Sligo :) ), Germany

Postby hermeyjdi » Tue Feb 19, 2008 8:50 pm

I think it is also good because it is an encourgement to all of us that we are not alone and that if she can over come tough things in her life then we can too. :D
Jesus said to Peter, "feed my sheep not experiment on my rats" -C S Lewis
User avatar
hermeyjdi
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 1445
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2005 4:02 am
Location: Nashville, TN USA

Postby Macha » Thu Mar 13, 2008 6:52 pm

hermeyjdi wrote:I think it is also good because it is an encourgement to all of us that we are not alone and that if she can over come tough things in her life then we can too. :D


You're totally right, Harm (OT: is it ok, when I call you so? :oops: ). For me, when I read Moya's book then it makes me think that you can go on - no matter what happens. There are not only good times - also bad times in life; but you can go on and then you'll see the light again (hope that makes sense in any way). I'm just trying to integrate (hope this is the right word) this message into my own life.
Image
User avatar
Macha
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 3338
Joined: Sat Aug 21, 2004 3:15 pm
Location: Kempten (twin town of Sligo :) ), Germany

Postby mermaid » Sun Mar 23, 2008 3:48 pm

just finished reading 'The other side of the Rainbow' and think that when the time is right, writing about all the stuff that has been and still is hanging around inside your head can be such a liberating experience. This is perhaps why journal/diary/blog writing is so popular??

The great thing about publishing your innermost thoughts/feelings/recollections, even the painful or uncomfortable ones, is that it can serve to make the reader feel more connected - knowing that someone else has had the same experience(s) and lived to tell the tale.

For me, Moya's 'journey' was told in such an authentic and heartfelt way that on times it almost felt like I was there, observing alongside her as it was all unfolding.

I guess it's another successful example of Moya's intention to unite people through her artistic expression :D


thank you!

mermaid
mermaid
New Member
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 3:34 pm
Location: Pembrokeshire

Postby Roibeard Óg » Sat Jul 26, 2008 10:30 am

Hey guys, sorry I've not been too active lately, I'm all over the place with design work! I've a few PMs to reply to so I'll try my best to get on this afternoon and reply to a few posts too!

I'd like to keep this topic alive, because it's very important I feel to be discussed. I feel that the only person who could answer that is Moya. From a fan's point of view, most will love the insight, and the encouragement of life in those page, but I'd say (guessing!) from Moya's point of view, everything revealed in the book has its place there.

Moya has said in interviews of how she is happy she wrote the book and happy that it has really helped people and herself to get that weight off her shoulders. I'm reading a few autobiographies at the minute which are very interesting, but a few feel very incomplete. To me, Moya's feels complete.

There's none of the idle celebrity gossip or all the 'biz' behind the scenes, but heart-felt fact, you know? That's what I love. It's about her, not who she had dinner with when she was nominated for a Grammy, or which celebrity got drunk backstage with her!! It's just such a pure biography, and that makes it very important.

I'd compare Moya's autobiography to one I'm almost finished with in terms of clarity, purity, honesty and personal importance; The Collected Autobiographies of Maya Angelou - two really great people. I designed flyers for a women's support group in Antrim recently and brought the book with me to give to the organiser, a good family friend. The group are now reading through the book - bright and dark chapters, and it's really helping them.

If Moya is happy with the book, and it is helping so many people, then surely too much has not been revealed, and although parts can be hard to read, they must certainly be constructive and helpful in life?

Since I first read the book a few years back when I joined this forum, I've changed. I've been attending meetings in Belfast, Antrim, Dublin and Armagh which are aimed at bringing communities together to support each other, and although many will disagree, this book not only carries a message to Christians, but to people from all walks of life. In every faith (or those without it), personality and political background (or those neutral), the meaning of being neighbourly, friendly, understanding and supportive is all set in one word, and that is 'love'.
"Tús maith, leath na hoibre!"
User avatar
Roibeard Óg
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 1170
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2004 3:13 pm
Location: Belfast/Lisburn, Ireland

Postby Phantas » Sat Jul 26, 2008 10:48 am

I, personally, was very happy to be able to purchase it, albeit secondhand. I started reading and couldn't put it down easily. I guess, because I was kind of brought up with Clannad during childhood I could also feel like I was there, as a fly on the wall, watching Moya's life unfold. With every turn for the worst I was hoping something good would come, and then it got even more worse! Horrifying!

Luckily, Moya found Tim through it all and eventually was able to put her demons to rest - by simply looking in the mirror and feeling - yes, it's part of my life. I have done it, I'm not proud but I do not need to hide it.

That's what this book tells me - the honesty is not about being honest - it's about accepting what you've been through, what you're doing and have done, and where you want to go. I see the book as a crossroad kind of thing. With the release of the book and coinciding with her album release WTTWW, it was a point where Moya made the decision that would define her person and the rest of her life ;)

Love,
Phantas
lost in the aether, leave a message...
User avatar
Phantas
Addicted to Moya
 
Posts: 1176
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2003 6:51 pm
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Postby sammi fredenburg » Sat Jul 26, 2008 4:24 pm

Phantas wrote:
Luckily, Moya found Tim through it all and eventually was able to put her demons to rest - by simply looking in the mirror and feeling - yes, it's part of my life. I have done it, I'm not proud but I do not need to hide it.

That's what this book tells me - the honesty is not about being honest - it's about accepting what you've been through, what you're doing and have done, and where you want to go. I see the book as a crossroad kind of thing. With the release of the book and coinciding with her album release WTTWW, it was a point where Moya made the decision that would define her person and the rest of her life ;)

Love,
Phantas


Phantas, you put it so well. when we find the love of our lives, not just get married, but find ourselves with someone who we mutually love even more than our own lives, it's amazing. and from what little i know, or what i have heard around here, Tim is her heartmate and a beautiful soul, a great romance and family now. so happy for them both.

and your point about honesty is priceless! i'm going to write it on my heart and share it often with those who have traveled down similar avenues in life, including the person who looks back at me in the mirror.

God bless you sir!

stay close,

sammi =)
"i can't get cross with moya, i love her too much . . . . " - bono (this line made my day!)
User avatar
sammi fredenburg
Enthusiastic Member
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Mon Jan 22, 2007 8:36 am
Location: seattle washington usa

PreviousNext

Return to The Other Side of the Rainbow

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 0 guests

cron