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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2005 4:29 pm
by BenWiganUK
I love the sound of Gaelic sung. I am disappointed that Enya won't be singing in Gaelic on her new album.

yes

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:01 pm
by moon
I think that Irish is still very alive, i'm learning to speak Irish

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 7:27 pm
by lizzy1e
I think it's still alive and needs to be kept alive by being taught to children from a young age and to make it appealing to people. Seems to me a lot of people felt it was "uncool" in the past.. hope that's changing.

I've been learning it from the books I bought in Gweedore... slowly but surely getting there. Pity my friend speaks it so quickly that I can hardly ever understand him... he doesn't seem to get that I need slow easy sentences.

Anyway - one positive thing is that it seems to be on most signs and in most announcements in Ireland's public places. Even the Luas in Dublin announced everything in Irish as well. :mrgreen:

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 9:59 pm
by deathrug
i said no because there is plenty of irish schools around.
I went to an all irish speaking school. The problem is trying to teenagers to learn it proparly. 8)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 12:59 pm
by the whistleplayer
I don't think it's dying as such, because there are quite a few people still interested in learning the language and doing so. But I think there are fewer and fewer people who have Irish as their first language and very few whose mothertongue is just Irish and who are not bilingual (i.e. also having English as their mother (or father) tongue).
I have the impression that the Irish language is kept alive artificially, because quite a few people (me included) think it's a beautiful language and because it's part of Irish culture, history and heritage. I think the main problem is that in practise (not officially I believe) English is the first language in Ireland, and with that I mean that most Irish people just speak English, because it's just easier to use that language in everyday life.

As an outsider, I think that the Irish people generally speaking have an ambivalent attitude to the Irish language. On one hand, it's not 'cool' for them to speak Irish but on the other hand they would be very sorry to see their own language die.
Somebody from the Gweedore Gaeltacht, with Irish as his first language, once told me that if he wanted to go to a bank in his own (supposedly Irish speaking) village, he couldn't speak Irish there because the employees don't speak (or refuse to speak) Irish... Now that's weird. Why do people start working in an Irish speaking area if they don't speak or even refuse to speak Irish?
Here in the Netherlands, if you want to work, you have to be able to speak Dutch eventually. You'll be able to get around with English for a while (because many Dutch people find it very interesting to practise their English with a native speaker), but if you really want to work and live among Dutch people, you'll have to learn the language eventually.
(Speaking Dutch is a very big issue in the discussion about integration of foreigners from countries as Morocco and Turkey).

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 5:22 pm
by Grania
deathrug wrote: The problem is trying to teenagers to learn it proparly. 8)


That sounds like pretty much any language - pity really isn't it?

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:48 pm
by lizzy1e
Well, I think it's great that you managed to attend and all Irish speaking school and pick up on the language, deathrug. It is tough learning any language after a certain age...

I know my dad wanted to start me on Faroese at age 6 or 7 but I got angry at him for suddenly switching to a foreign language like that and he gave up - it's probably best from as early as possible.

I agree with you Andrea... it doesn't seem to be spoken that much as a first language even in the Gaeltacht areas these days. It really is a pity... losing any language or culture is a great loss and it's definitly worthwhile preserving it.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 5:58 pm
by dids
Hello,

I voted No as I think it will never die as many artists uses it, and some Gaelic dictionaries or language guides begins to appear in some countries.
I wish to have the opportunity to learn it, it's a really beautiful language...

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 6:02 pm
by Methica
I´m kind off in the middle... One thing is sure, it´s dying in Ireland, because the younger generations don´t really want to learn it...
It´s getting life outside of Ireland, because thanks to all the wonderfull music people want to know the language and learn it!

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 8:46 pm
by nessieq
Methica wrote:I´m kind off in the middle... One thing is sure, it´s dying in Ireland, because the younger generations don´t really want to learn it...


I disagree- irish is rapidly becoming 'cool' again in some quarters- in fact i think it's undergone somewhat of a revolution recently, thanks largely to people like moya- I just hope it's enough to keep such a beautiful language alive.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 8:48 pm
by lilly
I voted 'no' because I think Irish is still very much alive. I hope it stays that way.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 9:01 pm
by Grania
Maybe I come across it more because of the music I hear - but I am inclined to agree it's still alive. I seem to encounter it at ever turn :wink:

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:43 am
by irish at heart
I voted no because it's very much alive in song and speech..of course, there is the Gaelic speaking area as well. ;) I also hope it stays alive.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 6:52 am
by dids
I know since this morning that Gaelic has entered the list of the official languages of the European Union, together with the language of the two new members... that's good news!

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2007 8:04 am
by Methica
nessieq wrote:
Methica wrote:I´m kind off in the middle... One thing is sure, it´s dying in Ireland, because the younger generations don´t really want to learn it...


I disagree- irish is rapidly becoming 'cool' again in some quarters- in fact i think it's undergone somewhat of a revolution recently, thanks largely to people like moya- I just hope it's enough to keep such a beautiful language alive.

Good, I stand corrected! Irish, It´s alive!!(screaming like Dr. frankenstein;))